Tag Archives: Brooke Warner

Free Webinar (Monday, April 17): What Made Love Warrior a Best-Selling Memoir?

SIGN UP TO JOIN US for this free one-hour installment of our popular best-seller series.

Monday, April 17th, at 4pm PT | 5pm MT | 6pm CT | 7pm ET

In this hour-long free webinar, Linda Joy and Brooke be exploring memoirs that bare all—and spare no one—using Glennon Doyle Melton’s new memoir, Love Warrior, as a guide. They will address the fears that invariably come up for writers who want to write their deepest truths and expose their most intimate—and often shameful—secrets. The webinar will address the fallouts of such naked writing—and talk about how sharing your truth has a way of both leveling everything and setting you free.

During this Free Webinar You Will Learn:

  1. The hard truths—how to share them, why to share them, and what the consequences are for you, the writer, and the story if you don’t.
  2. Intentional omission. What did Glennon leave out? How did this impact the story and her readers?
  3. How to tackle hard themes, and the balance a memoir must strike when you’re sharing the intimate details of your sometimes-messy life.
  4. Whether the fallout is worth it. A look at the repercussions of writing a memoir, how to determine your tolerance for other people’s reactions, and ways to know whether the timing is right, and if you can weather the possible consequences.

CLICK HERE TO GET MORE DETAILS AND TO REGISTER! It’s FREE.

Brooke & Linda Joy welcome you!

FREE WEBINAR

June 30, 2016

4 PM PDT/7 PM EDT

Brooke Warner and Linda Joy Myers

Scene: The Master Tool of Memoir Writing

Brooke and Linda Joy

In this free hour-long webinar, Brooke Warner and Linda Joy Myers are tackling the single-most important element of craft you need to master to write good memoir: scene. Anyone who reads and loves memoir knows that scenes are what makes your story come alive. But it goes deeper than that. Good scene writing can change your and your readers’ lives. How you write your memoir, with scenes that reach out and invite your reader to experience what you lived through, is the root of transformation, and the ticket to creating a work that resonates and stays with your reader, and that agents and editors will see as sellable.

  • The key elements that make scenes come alive.
  • Narration in scene and how and when to use it.
  • The single most powerful gift you can give yourself when you’re writing scenes.
  • How to track the arc of your scenes so you see the beginning, middle, and end.
  • Transitions and how they connect your scenes together.

Sign up here for this free webinar on writing scenes—the most important tool in your writing toolbox.

http://writeyourbookinsixmonths.com/scene-free-webinar

We look forward to seeing you there!

 

 

Story Circle Conference 2016 Wrap Up

Story Circle Conference 2016

I recently returned from the Story Circle Conference held in Austin, Texas. It was a whirlwind of teaching—Brooke Warner and I taught the pre-conference workshop  “Breaking Ground on Your Story.” My workshop “Building Your Memoir with Scene and Narration” followed up the focus on craft. We both noticed the need to integrate craft with inspiration, which we try to do in our workshops and Write Your Memoir in Six Months course—a new one starts in June! 

Coming to the conference brings back so many memories. My first time was in 2002 when I was a new author, having just written Becoming Whole-Writing Your Healing Story. I was shy and uncertain as a new writer, my head full of the questions that Brooke Warner addressed in her keynote. Is my workshop “good enough?” Will anyone want to read my words?

Story Circle Conference 2016

Story Circle Conference 2016

The most amazing part of this conference is meeting up again with old friends, like Tina Games and Sharon Lippincott, and meeting new ones I know mostly from books or online presence. Social media has offered wonderful ways to get to know people, but we all celebrated with big hugs when we finally met in person. I enjoyed long talks with Lisa Dale Norton, whose books Hawk Flies High and Shimmering Images were already my friends; and Susan Tweit, whose photos and posts I have followed on Facebook for years. Lisa’s workshop offered a new understanding of voice, and Susan showed the importance of place to bring our stories alive. There were other connections too, some quick, some over a glass of wine or coffee that made us wish we could live closer so every week we could have community and conversation.

Brooke’s Keynote

Brooke Warner presented an inspiring keynote, worthy of a standing ovation. I’ll summarize what got us to our feet.

Brooke Warner

Brooke Warner

First, she talked about how lucky she was to have been raised to believe in herself and her ideas. Many of us in the audience had grown up with the messages that we should stay silent, or mute our expression. Particularly, we often feel we have to be careful about saying or writing anything that might offend, hurt, or make someone uncomfortable. Brooke told us about her passion in championing women to publish during her eight years as Executive Editor at Seal Press. She was happy to be exposed to the huge variety of women’s stories, but came to realize that only a small percentage of the stories she loved could be published in the publishing environment that’s developed over the last decade. She began to think about a press that would publish women’s voices based on the merit of their writing and not their brand or platform—and She Writes Press was born in 2012. This year the press is celebrating multiple winners in the IPPY, Ben Franklin, and Next Generation Indie Book Awards.

Brooke became aware through her experience and research to the degree to which women writers have been silenced. Messages from society and our upbringing, both subtle and overt, affect our ability to claim our stories and get them out into the world.

Brooke cited statistics about women and publishing, pointing out the huge gender bias in publishing for women, and particular memoir. Women are less likely to be reviewed, less likely to win contests, and less likely to resubmit after receiving a rejection. Women tend to take rejection harder—and these statistics are sobering. Men are 5 times more likely than women to resubmit if their piece has been rejected. We need to change that!

Well-known writers such as Elizabeth Gilbert, who wrote Eat, Pray, Love, have been subjected to the bias against memoir. Gilbert likely received less accolades for her novel, The Signature of All Things, as a result of writing Eat, Pray, Love. Mary Karr, in her book the Art of Memoir, dedicated one chapter to discuss how Katherine Harrison was attacked for her book The Kiss.

We need to be reminded of our passion and motivation to write and to express ourselves. For some of us, including me, the story has been chasing us and won’t leave us alone. We need to write the book we couldn’t find in the bookstore. If it doesn’t exist, write it! We write to understand ourselves and our families, or to help someone who will benefit from our life lessons. There are many reasons to write, and reasons not to become discouraged.

“We have to keep saying yes, our story matters!” Brooke said.

Brooke offered 5 C’s that can help us stay inspired to write our stories.

  1. Community—we write our stories in community and we need the support of community.
  2. Commitment—we need to keep the commitment to ourselves and our story—and stay committed to getting our story out in the world, to share it with others through publishing.
  3. Championing—we need to champion each other and all writers by supporting, reading, and reviewing each other’s work.
  4. Claiming your work—we have to claim our right to write and publish our stories. No one will do this for us.
  5. Courage—it takes a lot of courage for us to dig deep and reveal our stories, and more courage to publish.

Brooke ended by urging us to take the time to get our stories written and to get past the fears and critical voices we carry. We have to champion ourselves and take the risk to be seen and heard. We need to write, and keep writing! We can change the world with our stories.

Magic of Memoir Anthology–Call for Submissions

SUBMIT TO OUR NEW ANTHOLOGY, MAGIC OF MEMOIR (NOVEMBER 2016 PUBLICATION DATE)

Editors: Linda Joy Myers and Brooke WarnerMagic cover

HOW TO SUBMIT YOUR INSPIRING STORY

  1. Go to  http://writeyourbookinsixmonths.com/call-for-submissions to enter your information and to pay the fee.
  2. Upload your submission.
  3. Wait for us to get in touch with you (decisions will be made by August 1).

ABOUT MAGIC OF MEMOIR

From teaching memoir for so many years, Brooke Warner and I have learned from our students, and well-known memoir writers, how challenging the journey can be—from mining for memories and experiences to the point of completing a well-written memoir. Everyone who sets out to write a memoir encounters its stages—from the excitement of starting to the dread that invariably comes when you’re facing down your demons. Then there are the challenges of craft—how to find the structure and words that convey your message. We want to know from you how you solved these problems.

In this collection, we are asking writers to share their stories of hard-earned wisdom. We want to learn how you dealt with the inner critic, or the practical strategies that provided motivation to write about the dark times your story might have brought up. Share with us the lessons you  learned from the  mistakes you made on this journey, and how you overcame them. Tell us what inspired you, what kept you going, and most of all why you tackled the challenge of writing a memoir. For Magic of Memoir, editors Linda Joy Myers, President of the National Association of Memoir Writers, and Brooke Warner, Publisher of She Writes Press, are looking for a broad perspective and specific tips on the discipline and inspiration you used to write your  memoir.

 

WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FOR

The following points are prompts to get you thinking about the range of essays you might write for Magic of Memoir.

We do not intend for you to try to cover all of these points, nor are you limited to what we list here.

  1. What challenges have you dealt with—craft, emotional surprises, wrestling with truth?
  2. What kinds of things did your inner critic say as you wrote your memoir and how did you get past them?
  3. Did you have “outer critics”—voices of family and friends—who challenged the idea of you writing a memoir? What did they say and how did you cope with that?
  4. What were your reasons for writing your memoir?
  5. Support and accountability: what factors or people helped you to keep writing?
  6. How did the issue of truth arise as you wrote? Did you have doubts about the truth of your story, or did other people’s take on the story influence you?
  7. Did you combine/collapse characters and time in your story? If yes, what were the factors that led to your decision to do that and what was the result?
  8. What were your concerns about exposing secrets, or revealing things that might upset your family, and how did you solve the issues that came up for you?
  9. Were you worried about lawsuits—and how did you handle this?
  10. What was it like to try to translate memories and moments into a story structure? What were the challenges and what helped you to sort that out?
  11. How many drafts of your memoir did you write before you completed it, and what was your editing and revision process?
  12. How long did it take you to write your memoir and what were the most interesting and or surprising things you learned on your journey?

 

SUBMISSIONS GUIDELINES

• Send your submissions in MS Word, 12 point type, Times New Roman. Double space your entry, and be sure to edit it. We advise that you find outside editors or peer readers to go over your piece for typos, grammar, and meaning. Manuscript presentation is important.
•    Nonfiction memoir submissions, up to 3,000 words maximum.
•    Please include a brief bio with contact information for the “About the Contributors” section.
•    Editors reserve the right to choose pieces based on appropriateness of subject, writing technique, and style. Minor editing for length or clarity should be expected.
• You do not have to be a published memoirist in order to submit. Previously published submissions are allowable as long as you can secure permission to reprint it from the original publisher. This anthology is being published on She Writes Press, and we welcome male contributors!

Submissions deadline is June 1, 2016, and the submissions fee is $20.

PRIZES and COMPENSATION

The top 18-20 submissions will be published in Magic of Memoir: Inspiration for the Writing Journey (She Writes Press, November 2016), edited by Linda Joy Myers, PhD, and Brooke Warner. The top three entries will receive these prizes.

1st place: $400

2nd place: $200

3rd place: $100

All chosen contributors will receive two complimentary copies of the book upon publication and the opportunity to buy unlimited at 50% off.

ANNOUNCEMENT OF WINNERS

We will announce the prize winners and the anthology contributors on August 1, 2016. We intend to get back to all of you directly, but you will find the update on August 1st on our site: www.writeyourmemoirinsixmonths.com.

ABOUT THE EDITORS

_RRP2639 edt promo

Linda Joy Myers, PhD, is president and founder of the National Association of Memoir Writers. Her memoir Don’t Call Me Mother—A Daughter’s Journey from Abandonment to Forgiveness was a finalist in the ForeWord Book of the Year Award, a finalist in the IndieExcellence Awards, and received Honorable Mention in the New York Book Awards. She’s the author of three books on memoir writing: The Power of Memoir—How to Write Your Healing Story, Journey of Memoir, and Becoming Whole. She writes for the Huffington Post, and co-teaches with Brooke Warner the program Write Your Memoir in Six Months. Together Myers and Warner co-authored Breaking Ground on Your Memoir. A therapist for 36 years, Myers speaks about memoir, healing, and the power of writing the truth.

 

Warner 2016 colorBrooke Warner is publisher of She Writes Press, president of Warner Coaching Inc., and author of What’s Your Book?, Green-light Your Book, How to Sell Your Memoir, and the co-author with Myers of Breaking Ground on Your Memoir. Brooke’s expertise is in traditional and new publishing. She is the former Executive Editor of Seal Press and currently sits on the boards of the Independent Book Publishers Association, the Bay Area Book Festival, and the National Association of Memoir Writers. She co-teaches with Linda Joy Myers the program Write Your Memoir in Six Months. Together Warner and Myers co-authored Breaking Ground on Your Memoir. She blogs actively on Huffington Post Books and SheWrites.com.

Please send any inquiries or points of clarification to writeyourbookinsixmonths@gmail.com. Please DO NOT submit your work to this email address.

Is Memoir on Your Bucket List? Free Memoir Webinar

 BUCKETS

FREE Memoir Webinar June 1 at 4pm PT | 6pm CT | 7pm ET

Is Memoir on Your Bucket List?

Have you been thinking of writing a memoir, but aren’t sure if you should, how your family will react, or where to start? These are typical places where people hesitate about writing their story. But you can get help for all these problems.

I am excited to join with my colleague Brooke Warner again to offer you a free webinar this next Monday, June 1 that addresses the places where people who want to write typically get stuck. It doesn’t help either when other writers broadcast that you have to be well known, or an experienced writer to write your own story.

Take it from us—and we have coached over 150 people in our Write Your Memoir in Six Months classes—all you need is the desire to write and be willing to jump into the project you have always been meaning to do: write your story, share the family stories you know so well, help others learn from your wisdom and life experience.

The details are below. Hope to see you on the call!
FREE webinar June 1 at 4pm PT | 6pm CT | 7pm ET

Is Memoir on Your Bucket List?

If so, let this be the year you make it happen! This free 1-hour is a celebration of the memoir phenomenon, and an exploration of why now is a fantastic time to start and/or finish your memoir.

What we’ll be covering:

The reasons why people write memoir.
One that we encounter often in the baby boomer generation is the desire to leave a legacy for the family. Maybe you want to explore who you were forty years ago, and to go deeper into your experience to sort out who you were and what your dreams were, and how you evolved into who you became. Another reason people write memoir is to find a way to tell a story that no one has ever told before—about themselves, about an experience. Do you have a story that’s full of inspiration? That might help or inform others? What are your stories? We invite you to consider this question and explore with us.

Understanding what memoir is.
There is still, amazingly, a lot of discussion about who should and shouldn’t write a memoir; whether people who aren’t likely to get picked up by a big publisher should bother to write. There is speculation that there is too much memoir being written now, and that somehow it’s reserved for people who have a “valuable” story to tell, which immediately puts a judgment on memoir. We know that each story is valuable. Each story has something to offer the reader. In our classes we teach about how to engage your readers, and refine what you’re writing, but first you need to get clear on what you have to share with the world.

5 solid strategies for getting started.
Every writer is different and every story needs a beginning. But do you know where to start? Or maybe you’ve started, and you need some tips for getting restarted? These strategies work for that too. We will discuss the ways that you can begin and develop your memoir. We’ll give you pointers for ways to sort out your hundreds of thousands of memories into your story—with themes, turning points, and lessons for the reader.

Success stories
Many of the writers we work with have finished their memoirs. Some have found agents, while others have gone on to publish their work with publishers or on their own. Many are working on their final revisions. Writing a memoir is an ongoing creative process that’s demanding at times, and other writers’ stories are often the inspiration and push you need to believe that you can do it too. We’ve worked with students who didn’t consider themselves “writers,” who learned the techniques of good writing and developed their craft and now fully own that title. When they sign with a publishing company or win prizes—as many of our authors have—we celebrate in their success. Writing a memoir does not have to be a dream you have, something you hope you might do one day; it can be a reality!

REGISTER TODAY!

 

Hope to see you on the call!

 

Linda Joy

Testimonials

Myers makes a compelling case for the power of words as a form of healing and growth.

James W. Pennebaker, Ph.D. professor of psychology, The University of Texas at Austin and author, Opening Up and Writing To Heal

...the NAMW memoir classes with Linda Joy Myers are wonderful

Kathy Pooler